CPC #7: Mirror Cinquain

Cinquain Poetry Challenge #7

The Mirror Cinquain

Before we dive into this new form, let’s review the definition of a cinquain. We have already learned that the cinquain (also known as a quintet, quintain, or pentastich) comes in all shapes and sizes, with the one consistency being that it is but five lines long. It may have meter and rhythm (i.e. the limerick), or it may be distinguished by a particular syllable count (i.e. the Crapsey Cinquain).

The Mirror Cinquain is actually a 10-line poem (decastich), written in a single stanza, and made up of two Crapsey Cinquains, where the second is reversed, forming a mirror image of the first.

So in summary, the Mirror Cinquain is:

• A decastich (10-line poem) written in a single stanza
• Syllabic count: 2-4-6-8-2-2-8-6-4-2
• Should express a complete thought
• May address any theme
• May express any mood
• Rhyme is optional
• Looks good centered on the page

Sample:

The sample below is one of my own; it is a declaration of love from a man to a woman. Line 10 reflects Line 1 and also contains a bit of a double meaning, as you will see. The center lines are the highlight, for he is almost afraid to ask, and yet he simply must know the answer to the question. I also wrote a sequel of sorts to this poem. Look for it to appear on my blog this coming Thursday….

With All My Heart

“I do
Not have a lot
Of what this world calls wealth,
But I have enough.” Then pausing,
“Do you
Love me?
For, darling, I love you with all
My heart.” He held his breath.
“Oh, yes!” she said.
“I do!”

Copyright © 2019 Abigail Gronway – All Rights Reserved

I wrote another as well. The final Mirror Cinquain I’m going to share with you (which was actually the first one I wrote) is a true reflection of itself. I’ll share it for the link. As I wrote this one, I stared at the name of the form while waiting for an idea to come to mind. Then I noticed that mirror has two syllables, and I heard that famous rhyme in my head, “Mirror, mirror on the wall, who is the fairest of us all?” This gave me the idea of putting mirror, mirror together in the middle of the poem. The rest of it came as I thought back to a time when I had two mirrors in the bathroom and could position them in such a way that it seemed my reflection went on into infinity. Thus the Mirror Cinquain became a true mirror of itself.


Write Your Own

Now it’s time for you to write your own Mirror Cinquain.

    1. Write your poem.
    2. Publish to your blog.
    3. Come back here and click the link to add your post to the linkup.
    4. Encourage your friends to join the party!
    5. Read other people’s posts and leave a comment.

    You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

    Click here to enter

5 Replies to “CPC #7: Mirror Cinquain”

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